THE BIG PAGE

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The Big Page
Here, you’ll find a regularly updated selection of news reports, notices about notable events, critical articles, love notes, heads-up advisories, and first looks at the subjects that seize our attention and rock our boat. Hop in!
ANOTHER SIDE OF THE MUSICIAN SHANE MacGOWAN: VISUAL ARTIST
Recently, in London, Shane MacGowan, who is best known as the lead singer and songwriter of the band The Pogues, revealed another side of his creativity — his work as a visual artist. Luciano Oltramari reports about MacGowan’s exhibition at Andipa Gallery and new book. Free-access article.

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PANDORA VAUGHAN: ART AS COPING MECHANISM — RIGHT NOW
The British-Canadian artist Pandora Vaughan uses needlepoint to render images of the floor plans of prisons, and sewing techniques and fabrics to create works of art that disarm their emotionally-psychologically heavy, daunting subjects with the delicacy of their craftsmanship. Cathy Ward, brutjournal reviews Vaughan’s recent exhibition at the Horse Hospital.

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DANIELLE JACQUI: THE ART BRUT CREATOR’S GRAND, NEW MONUMENT
In November, the French art brut creator Danielle Jacqui inaugurated a big, new, ceramic-sculptural project at La Ferme des Tilleuls, an arts center in the small town of Renens, in southwestern Switzerland, near Lausanne. brutjournal was there and captured in photos the grand-opening event and the rich surface textures of Jacqui’s towering structure, which is covered in thousands of handcrafted ceramic tiles. Coming soon.
EVA PETRIC: SHADOWS & EMOTIONS
Continuing our exploration of the IN PRAISE OF SHADOWS theme we began exploring in last month’s issue, we check in with the artist Eva Petric. Based in Vienna and New York, Petric is interested in scents and the sense of smell, and in shadows. She has examined these subjects in her work, even creating what she calls a “periodic table of shadow emotions.” Here, she tells brutjournal about what she’s up to in her studio — and in the laboratory of her imagination. Coming soon.
WE’LL DRINK TO THAT: THE CAMPAIGN TO SAVE TRADER VIC’S IN LONDON
Located in the basement of the London Hilton on Park Lane, the British capital’s branch of a famous American bar-restaurant chain known for its Polynesian décor and colorful cocktails was being forced to close — by Dec. 31, 2022. Cathy Ward reports about efforts to keep it going and to preserve its art-filled interior. Free-access article.

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HENRY FLYNT: RUINOUS SPIRITUALITY
In the 1960s, the American artist-philosopher Henry Flynt, who was associated with Fluxus, coined the term “concept art” and became known for his anti-art demonstrations against certain art institutions. Known for his philosophical writings, he recently published a new book, Ruinous Spirituality. We’ll look at this new volume and also at its predecessor, which examined the topic of art and spirituality in its own ways. Coming soon.
DICK HIGGINS’ SOMETHING ELSE PRESS WAS SOMETHING ELSE
In 1963, Dick Higgins, an American artist, composer, art theorist, poet, and key figure in the international Fluxus community of avant-gardists, established Something Else Press, which published concrete poetry, works by Fluxus artists, and other experimental material. It folded in 1974. Now, Primary Information, a Brooklyn-based company, has issued A Something Else Reader, an anthology featuring highlights from the works Higgins and his collaborators introduced decades ago. Sarah Fensom reports.

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VIEW THE FILM, FREE OF CHARGE: “VALTON TYLER: FLESH IS FICTION”
The self-taught artist Valton Tyler (1944-2017) lived and worked in Dallas, Texas, and its environs. He created remarkable works — oil paintings, ink drawings on paper, complex etchings — that remain hard to classify according to existing style or genre labels. In 2017, Edward M. Gómez (brutjournal’s founder) and cinematographer Chris Shields made the first-ever film about Tyler’s life and art, which the artist saw before he died. This 42-minute-long film will reside permanently here, on the magazine’s website. It may be viewed in its entirety, free of charge. Watch it and get to know the bright, bizarre world of a techno-baroque visionary. Free access to the article and the film.

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